Ezell vs. City of Chicago

July 6, 2011

  • Rhonda Ezell sued the city of Chicago to bring gun ranges to the city for law abiding citizens
  • After Ezell won the challenge against the total ban on ranges, Chicago changed its ordinances to ‘allow’ gun ranges, but made the zoning rules and construction requirements so restrictive they are prohibitive
  • September 29, 2014 – the case was taken back to court, and an opinion and order was issued on
  • Alan Gura Attorney 

Ezell II

January 18th 2017, the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that the city of Chicago’s ban on gun ranges was unconstitutional.

March 15th. 2017 the final judgement was entered by judge Virginia M. Kendall, indicating that the city of Chicago withdrew their motion to stay the proceedings

 two federal lawsuits against the City of Chicago to bring gun ranges to the city for law abiding citizens

“If the city demands that you take this class, they should provide a facility for you to do it. You don’t want a person to have a gun they don’t know how to use. No one should have to drive 40 miles outside the city limits to comply with a city ordinance.”

– Rhonda Ezell

http://chicagogunsmatter.org/history/33-ezell-v-chicago

https://www.saf.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/ezelldecision.pdf

McDonald v. City of Chicago

Argued March 2, 2010
Decided June 28, 2010

  • 561 U.S. 742
  • Applied the 2nd Amendment to the states through the 14th Amendment
  • decision of the Supreme Court of the United States
  • found that the right of an individual to “keep and bear arms” is protected under the Second Amendment
  •  

14th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, ratified in 1868, granted citizenship to all persons born or naturalized in the United States—including former slaves—and guaranteed all citizens “equal protection of the laws.”

All persons born or naturalized in the United States and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside. No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any State deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws. – Section 1

14th Amendment 1868

District of Columbia vs. Heller

  • Argued March 18, 2008
    Decided June 26, 2008
  • 554 U.S. 570
  •  landmark case from the Supreme Court of the United States
  • held that the Second Amendment protects an individual’s right to possess a firearm unconnected with service in a militia
  • Supreme Court affirmed by a vote of 5 to 4
  • Heller had approached the National Rifle Association about a lawsuit to overturn the D.C. gun ban, but they declined

Presser v. Illinois

Argued November 23–24, 1885
Decided January 4, 1886

the Second Amendment to the United States Constitution limited only the power of Congress and the national government to control firearms, not that of the states, a

 “Unless restrained by their own constitutions, state legislatures may enact statutes to control and regulate all organizations, drilling, and parading of military bodies and associations except those which are authorized by the militia laws of the United States.” It states that the Second Amendment to the United States Constitution limited only the power of Congress and the national government to control firearms, not that of the states, and that the right to peaceably assemble was not protected by the clause referred to except to petition the government for a redress of grievances.